All practical motorcycle tests are conducted by a DVSA examiner at a Driving Standards Agency test centre. Our local test centres are Walton (Thorpe Arch, Wetherby) for Module 1 and Knaresborough for Module 2.

The test is in two parts and candidates must pass the Module 1 test before being allowed to attempt Module 2. We complete and pass Module 1 before booking Module 2; this gives us enough time in case any extra training is required. Module 1 tests are conducted on a Sunday.

If you start your Module 1 as a restricted test you cannot change to a DAS (big bike test) for Module 2 or vice versa.

Module 1

Module 1 tests are conducted on a Monday (Usually!). The Module 1 test comprises of 12 exercises in total, taking no more than 15 minutes.

Most of the exercise you will have completed on you CBT training, in one form or another, with the exception of the slalom and hazard avoidance exercises.

The examiner will explain each of the exercise for you before you do them.

At the start of the test your examiner will check your documents, so make sure that you take these with you; driving licence (both parts for the new photo card licence or the licence and proof of ID e.g. your passport), CBT certificate (DL196) and your Theory Test pass certificate. The examiner will ask you to sign the insurance declaration to be sure that you are insured while riding on the test.

You will make your way to the bike and he will explain the first 2 exercises which is a manual handling exercise and on/off the stand. After this you move onto the slalom (a slow speed control exercise) immediately followed by completing a figure of eight 2/3 times.

You then move on to the walk slow exercise and U turn (again a slow speed control exercise).

You will then be sent off to travel round a set course of cones at a speed of 19 mph accelerating out of those, through speed measuring equipment, to complete the controlled stop exercise.

You will then be sent off to travel round a set course of cones; again, at a speed of 19 mph accelerating out of those, through speed measuring equipment, to complete the emergency stop exercise, this is to be done at a minimum of 31.06 MPH and stopping quickly and safely in complete control. (This must be completed successfully before the next exercise. Failure to do so will result in the test been terminated.)

You will then be sent off to travel round a set course of cones; again, at a speed of 19 mph accelerating out of those, through speed measuring equipment, to complete the hazard avoidance exercise this is to be done at a minimum of 31.06 MPH and stopping with your front wheel in between a set of cones at a specified point.

If you fail to achieve the minimum speed on the Emergency Stop or Hazard avoidance exercise you will be given one more opportunity to complete these exercises at the end of each of the exercise.

You are allowed five ‘minor’ errors (E.G. Failing to do a rear observation) before the test becomes a fail. Hitting a cone putting a foot down or dropping the bike will result in a failure.

This must be completed successfully before taking your Module 2 test.

Module 2

Module 2 tests are only available on weekdays, so you will need to arrange at least a half day off to attend the test and don’t forget the training days! (We are available for training at weekends).

At the start of the test your examiner will check your documents, so make sure that you take these with you; driving licence (both parts for the new photo card licence or the licence and proof of ID e.g. your passport), CBT certificate (DL196) , Theory Test pass certificate and your Module 1 pass certificate.

The examiner will ask you to sign the insurance declaration to be sure that you are insured while riding on the test.

The examiner will issue you with a radio (The radio will be used to give directions only, and in between directions the examiner will not speak, so you will not be distracted and then test your eyesight (Module 2 only) by asking you to read a car number plate.

He will ask you some safety questions, which will be about basic care of the machine and how to carry a passenger.

The Maintenance Questions

The maintenance questions are split into ‘Show Me, Tell Me’ questions.

If he says ‘Show me how….’ he will expect you to carry out a check physically.

If he says ‘Tell me about…’ you just need to explain to him your answer.

Here are some examples he may ask you (with answers).

• Q1) Identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.

Identify where to check level, i.e. dipstick or sight glass. Explain that level should be between max and min marks. For dipstick remove dipstick and wipe clean, return and remove again to check oil level against max/min marks. For sight glass, ensure glass is clean when checking.

• Q2) Show me how you would check that the horn is working on this machine (off road only).

Check is carried out by using control (turn on ignition if necessary.

• Q3) Identify where the brake fluid reservoir is and tell me how you would check that you have a safe level of hydraulic fluid.

Identify reservoir, check level against high/low markings

• Q4) Show me how you would check that the lights & brake lights and reflectors are clean and working.

Operate switch (turn on ignition if necessary), identify reflectors. Check visually for cleanliness and operation.

• Q5) Tell me how you would check the condition of the chain on this machine.

Check for chain wear, correct tension and rear wheel alignment. Tension should be adjusted as specified in the machine handbook. Drive chain should be lubricated to ensure that excessive wear does not take place.

• Q6) Show me what checks you would make on the steering movement before using the machine.

Handlebars should be free to move smoothly from full left lock to full right lock without any control cables being stretched, trapped or pinched and without any snagging between moving and fixed parts.

• Q7) Tell me how you would check your tyres to ensure that they are correctly inflated, have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

Correct tyre pressure settings can be found in the owner’s manual. Pressures should be checked using a reliable gauge. Tread depth must be at least 1mm deep, forming a continuous band at least ¾ of the breadth of the tread and all the way around. There should be no lumps, bulges or tears.

• Q8) Show me how you would check the operation of the front brake on this machine.

Wheel the machine forward and apply the front brake.

• Q9) Identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.

Identify where to check level, ie dipstick or sight glass. Explain that level should be between max and min marks. For dipstick remove dipstick and wipe clean, return and remove again to check oil level against max/min marks. For sight glass, ensure glass is clean when checking.

• Q10) Tell me how you would check your tyres to ensure that they are correctly inflated, have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

Correct tyre pressure settings can be found in the owner’s manual. Pressures should be checked using a reliable gauge. Tread depth must be at least 1mm deep, forming a continuous band at least ¾ of the breadth of the tread and all the way around. There should be no lumps, bulges or tears.

• Q11) Show me how you would check the operation of the brakes on this machine.

Check for excessive travel on the brake lever and the brake pedal and for unusual play or sponginess.

• Q12) Show me how you would check the operation of the engine cut out switch.

Operate switch, without the engine being started.

• Q13) Tell me how you would check your tyres to ensure that they are correctly inflated, have sufficient tread depth and that their general condition is safe to use on the road.

Correct tyre pressure settings can be found in the owner’s manual. Pressures should be checked using a reliable gauge. Tread depth must be at least 1mm deep, forming a continuous band at least ¾ of the breadth of the tread and all the way around. There should be no lumps, bulges or tears.

• Q14) Identify where the brake fluid reservoir is and tell me how you would check that you have a safe level of hydraulic fluid.

Identify reservoir, check level against high/low markings.

• Q15) Show me how you would check the operation of the engine cut out switch.

Operate switch, without the engine being started.

The Pillion Questions

5 Things to Adjust when Carrying a Passenger

The examiner on Module 2 will ask you some questions about what needs to be adjusted on the bike before taking a passenger.

Mirrors: with increased weight on the rear the mirrors, if left, will angle down and not give a proper view behind.

Headlight: with increased weight on the rear the headlight, if left, will angle up and may dazzle oncoming traffic and will not illuminate the road correctly at night.

Suspension: with the increased weight the suspension will have to work harder this will affect the handling of the bike. It can be adjust by referring to the owner’s manual.

Foot pegs: The rear foot pegs need putting down for the passengers feet.

Tyre Pressures: The tyre pressure requires adjusting due to the increased weight of the passenger as it will affect the shape of the tyre. Refer to the owner’s manual for correct adjustment.

How Does Carrying A Passenger Affect The Motorcycle

The examiner on Module 2 will ask you some questions about carrying a passenger.

They may not ask them in this format but just remember the ABC (might ask something like ‘what would happen with the braking distances while carrying a passenger’).

Remember A, B, C.

Acceleration: The acceleration is affected in that, with the increased weight of the passenger, you need to leave a bigger gap to pull away and out of junctions as it will be slower and it will take longer to overtake.Give your self more time.

Braking: Due to the increased weight your stopping distances will need to increase, so leave a bigger gap between you and the car in front. Generally you will have to start braking earlier in all situations to come to a progressive stop safely.Give your self more time.

Cornering: The increase weight and the seating position of the passenger moves the centre of gravity of the bike further up and towards the rear of the bike and more steering input/effort is required while cornering. It also effects the general handling of the bike.

The test route should take about forty minutes to complete.

There are several routes, and involve various speed limits up to the national speed limit. The examiner will expect you to make reasonable progress by getting up to the speed limit, where correct and appropriate and overtaking if necessary, where it is safe to do so.

The examiner may also include any of the following; hill start, angled start, slow riding or he may simply ask you to stop and then ride away again. Your instructor will cover these exercises with you.

For more information on the test visit www.dsa.gov.uk, then click on publications and document D1.

If you’re still not so sure or have never ridden before but think it just might be for you have a look at our ‘Give It A Go!’ page.

Book onto a Course